Presentations from the 4th International Conference on Carbon Accounting


 
 

David Wilson | Scotland’s Low Carbon Ambitions

 

Adam Hawkes | Marginal Emissions Rates in Energy System Change

 

John Barrett | The Role of Governments in Dealing with Consumption-Based Accounting

 

Missing the target? Dr Angela Druckman, University of Surrey

Missing the target? To what extent does the Rebound Effect cause a shortfall in expected carbon reductions?

Angela Druckman, University of Surrey, Mona Chitnis, University of Surrey, Steve Sorrell, University of Sussex, and Tim Jackson, University of Surrey
Sustainable Lifestyles Research Group (SLRG)

Abstract
Household energy efficiency and abatement actions are widely advocated in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But to what extent do these measures live up to expectations? Due to a phenomenon known as the ‘Rebound Effect’, carbon reductions estimated by simple engineering calculations are frequently not realised in practice. For example, installation of loft insulation will most certainly increase the thermal efficiency of homes. But this will free up money that otherwise would be spent by householders on energy bills: this money may then be spent on heating houses to higher temperatures, buying extra furniture, or, say, flying on vacations. Alternatively it may be put into household savings. All of these options give rise to carbon emissions, thus the total carbon saved may be less than predicted. Indeed, in some instances, emissions may even increase – this being known as ‘Backfire’. In this talk I will present estimates of the extent of the Rebound Effect under a range of assumptions. The talk will conclude with a discussion concerning the policy implications of the findings, and the conditions under which Rebound and Backfire can be minimised.
 

 

Gary Davis | Setting the Boundaries

 

Robin Curry | The Use of Ecological and Carbon Footprint Analysis in Policy Making Using the REAP Model

Abstract
A range of Northern Ireland policies and strategies were evaluated using an environmental input-output analysis model (the Resources and Energy Analysis Programme, REAP). The analysis provided the first regional evidence base that current sustainable development policy commitments would not lead to the necessary reductions in either the Ecological Footprint or CO2 emissions. The paper will present the outputs of the analysis and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of environmentally-extended I-O models (EE-IO) for allocating Ecological and Carbon Footprints, production and consumption based reporting of the Carbon Footprint and some options for assessing the accuracy of the estimates derived from EE-IO models.

 

Gary Lanigan | Agricultural Greenhouse Gases – Emissions Intensity, Key Uncertainties and Mitigation

 

Charles Henderson | How Fit For Purpose Are Community Accounting Systems?

 

Stuart MacPherson | Driving Carbon Reductions in a Stagnant Building Market

 

Jim Baird | Carbon Accounting for Waste Management

 

Rachel Dunk | The ICARB Sector Workshop Programme

 

Making Carbon Count in Scotland, Dr Daniel Hinze, Scottish Government